Knitting Wales – for Dewi Sant

Well, I’m still coughing, so no singing of the national anthem today (a great relief to all and sundry, I’m sure). But as it is St David’s Day, aka Dydd Gwyl Dewi Sant, I am dressed as a giant leek. This makes a change from being dressed as a dragon* or a Welsh cake, of course.

Oh, OK, I’m not. But I am dressed like this:

Dyce painting

Courtesy National Museum of Wales

Thank you William Dyce, for Welsh Landscape with Two Women Knitting, which I rather like. I’m the one in the red. Dyce, incidentally, was a Scot. He came here for his health, apparently. Just as well that was in 1860. If he’d come here now he wouldn’t have lasted very long. Cough.

*Many years ago a rugby-mad friend went to Twickenham for a match with some mates. One was arrested for, ahem, public nuisance – the only one who had dressed (entirely) as a dragon, except for his DMs. He had nothing else to wear and so appeared in court in full rig, to much hilarity. Asked afterwards to comment he said ‘I don’t know why they picked on me, I don’t think I was that obvious, there were four of us doing it.’

 

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10 thoughts on “Knitting Wales – for Dewi Sant

  1. Eau de Nil

    My father’s name is David, so he claims today as his day, despite not being Welsh, not having been to Wales since we had a family holiday in the Gower several decades ago, and not liking leeks. Or dragons, as far as I know.

    Happy St. David’s Day, Kate and my Dad.

    Reply
    1. kate Post author

      Happy saint’s day, your Dad!

      (Hey, at least he’s been to Wales. I was at Uni with someone who strongly asserted her Welsh identity despite never having set foot in the place, and neither had her parents but one grandmother had been born near Cardiff, apparently. She was emphatically Welsh and would brook no arguments, despite at least 75% of her make-up coming from Essex.)

      Reply
  2. Lydia

    Dydd Gwyl Dewi Sant!

    Get well very soon… I hope you are sitting by a warm fire enveloped in a hand knitted shawl? I am going to join you in the great picture above, imagine me in the middle perhaps wearing a green shawl and knitting my Hansel Hap which I am about to start…. my first KAL ever … and it will contain a little bit of Black Welsh Mountain too.
    Cymer ofer a brysiwch i wella!

    Reply
    1. kate Post author

      Oh dear, I was sitting by a radiator wrapped in a fleece blanket! (The stove sets the coughing off, and the fleece blanket was to hand, though it should certainly have been wool instead. Slapped wrists, me….)

      I want to knit a hap, and I saw that KAL on Ravelry. I’ve got the yarn – but I’ve also got three projects to finish off first. Must finish stuff. Must finish stuff.

      Reply
  3. Annie

    I celebrated by knitting a few rounds on the mister’s Black Welsh Mountain hat (it’s feeling a bit prickly but I’ll line the brim and he still has enough hair for the rest not to cause problems).

    According to the 18thC Englishman’s travel diaries that I was using as a source for my (now abandoned) PhD Welsh women are among the most industrious, and certainly more so than most men. He was over your way somewhere when he wrote that. He did seem to think that Wales was a tad unhealthy though.

    Reply
    1. kate Post author

      BWM seems to be a bit of a theme here except with me – I had a lovely fleece, but I left it in the shed and it rotted. Never seen anything like it in my life – all lanolin, like something off CSI. I have to say that even though the fleece was a) premium and b) lamb, it was scratchy.

      He was right on unhealthy, that’s all I can say. The whole surgery’s down with it now, which – while possibly not surprising – doesn’t give you a lot of confidence. Seems to take about a month to clear. Bring out your dead! Bring out your dead!

      Reply
  4. croftgarden

    I think my granny would have put the lanolin to good use – larding your chest and wrapping you in a flannel vest. I’m sure lanolin is as good as goose grease!

    Reply

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