The Woolwinding Eyelet Shawl is born…

Actually, it’s something of a toddler now, as it was ‘born’ in 2012, but I’ve only just got round to putting the pattern on Ravelry. I know, I know, I’ve been saying for ages ‘I must put this on Ravelry’, and doling out photocopies and printouts all over the place, but I have finally done it.

It’s up (or will be very shortly, as soon as approved – yup, it’s here). And it’s a free download if you’re on Rav. All you need are one skein of sock wool, or something similar, and 3.75 needles. Or needle, rather: it needs a circular after the start.

And it’s called the Woolwinding Eyelet Shawl.

woolwinding shawl 1

Sorry it’s not called something more exciting, imaginative or creative, but it’s what it is. It’s an eyelet shawl and it comes from Woolwinding. I did think about finding another name for it, but my mind went completely blank and – apart from silly suggestions, including almost anything you could think of in Welsh including ‘ffwlbart’ (polecat – gee, thanks) – I couldn’t come up with anything reasonable.

That’s not to say that it hasn’t been called names, mind. This year in Shetland two of us were knitting it and, boy, did it get called names. Basically you need to concentrate at the very start for the pattern set up, not chat / order tea and cakes in the Peerie Cafe / get distracted by what your neighbour is knitting / watch an exciting DVD.

woolwinding 2

But once you’re off, you’re off. You knit on until you either run out of yarn or lose the will to live (something common to almost all shawls, I have found). Then you block it – and there are instructions on the pattern, which is written so that novices to lace / shawl knitting can follow it, as well as more experienced knitters. I tend to block it so that the two end points of the triangle curve upwards, as I find that makes it more wearable – and the lace pattern is designed to allow for this.

And then  you wear it. Or rather Doris wears it:

woolwinding 3

and, more sensibly from the back,

woolwinding 4

These two are in Noro Kureyon Sock, and the top one is a skein of hand-dyed loveliness from Mam a Mi; I’ve often knitted it in Araucania’s Ranco Sock (the last image is another hand-dyed yarn).

I’m getting quite used to seeing it around now, as it’s been available through Knit One in Dolgellau for some time. A couple of weeks ago I sat behind one at the garden club, and another won the knitting section in the village show last year. Copies have been used by members of the the Guild of Weavers, Spinners and Dyers I go to, and this next one is by one of them. It uses all the bits and pieces from the Guild’s dyeing picnic:

Mary's woolwinding

The cast off has been a little unfamiliar to some people, but It’s worth persisting as it’s very elastic and also gives a lovely finish, especially with a variegated yarn:

Woolwinding 5

It’s really simple, honest: right side facing and with a slightly larger size needle, knit two together. Slip the resulting stitch from the right needle back onto the left needle and repeat.

Anyway, there you go: tah dah, the Woolwinding Eyelet Shawl. And if you’re not on Ravelry, then do join – it’s fantastic. What a resource. Even if you don’t use the forums, and many people don’t, it’s so useful for pattern ideas, yarn information, storing a record of your stash or your patterns – and of course finding lots and lots and lots of patterns. Like this one…

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12 thoughts on “The Woolwinding Eyelet Shawl is born…

    1. kate Post author

      Thank you, and you got it in one – I came up with it because I hadn’t found one that really showed off variegated yarn (which I am completely addicted to)…!

      Reply
    1. kate Post author

      Thank you – I just get a huge buzz from seeing what other people do with it – like the one from my dyeing colleague. She’d woven in so many ends, and immaculately, too….

      Reply
    1. kate Post author

      It’s just logic, really. Though I have to admit there was a fair amount of swearing at the start (and still is, ahem, cough cough, when I get distracted). Not that long once I got it sussed!

      I find it easier to chart lace when I’m fiddling with a pattern, because you can see the way it develops and work it out. But when I’m knitting lace I find written instructions easier (and it was written down with people in mind who don’t like using charts – I know from working in the wool shop for four hours each week that there are more of them than you might think, given how universal charts are now).

      Reply
    1. kate Post author

      Great – it’s a really good almost intro to shawls, and congratulations on your first! (This looks really impressive when done – great for gifts…)

      Reply
  1. knittingdoctor

    Oh that looks like a lovely pattern for just about any weight yarn. It might even look good in my wacko hand spun.

    Reply
    1. kate Post author

      It’s very adaptable – several people in our Guild have knitted it in handspun and it works. Must admit that using handspun for it is on my to do list, too…

      Reply

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